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Drinking cistern water (1)

4crissy

(@4crissy)

Advanced Member

Is it okay to drink the water from the cistern if I run it through a brita filter pitcher first?

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Topic starter Posted : September 23, 2010 12:12 am

Drinking cistern water (2)

popflops

(@popflops)

Advanced Member

We drink our cistern water without faucet filterization and it tastes fine. Of course, I've spent the last 11 years drinking well water and "city" water tastes like chlorine to me, so take my opinion with a grain of salt. 🙂

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Posted : September 23, 2010 12:17 am

Drinking cistern water (3)

STXBob

(@STXBob)

Trusted Member

I think Brita says that the water must be biologically safe to drink before you run it through their filter.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 1:44 am

Drinking cistern water (4)

cheryl96s

(@cheryl96s)

Advanced Member

No, No, Hell NO! Get your water tested first. If the water is not chlorinated, filtered and whatever else, it is probably not good to drink!!! YUK. think about it, the rain runs off of the roofs that have decaying leaves, bird crap, lizard crap and whatever else kind of crap. People have found dead iguanas, plastic buckets, rusting tools and pressure treating lumber in the bottoms of cisterns.
With that being said, yes , cisterns can be clean and have good drinking water....if they (owner) does things properly. Condos have rules about water safety/cleanliness- private residential homes do not- so I am told by lawyers.

Just my opinion.......

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Posted : September 23, 2010 2:33 am

Drinking cistern water (5)

stxer

(@stxer)

Advanced Member

No, No, Hell NO! Get your water tested first. If the water is not chlorinated, filtered and whatever else, it is probably not good to drink!!! YUK. think about it, the rain runs off of the roofs that have decaying leaves, bird crap, lizard crap and whatever else kind of crap. People have found dead iguanas, plastic buckets, rusting tools and pressure treating lumber in the bottoms of cisterns.
With that being said, yes , cisterns can be clean and have good drinking water....if they (owner) does things properly. Condos have rules about water safety/cleanliness- private residential homes do not- so I am told by lawyers.

Just my opinion.......

You make cistern water sound really scary. In fact the reality about water quality is somewhat different than you have stated.. Cheryl seems to have been influenced by the 'ehew god ..it's not clean" water quality group. There is no doubt that cistern water is potentially unhealthy, but so is public water and well water too... many of us have been drinking cistern water for years with only a little damage to our brains and bodies...lol.

I do not know the scientific facts, but, just like the public water that is pumped through pipes, if water is treated it should not make you sick. In fact cistern water is more in YOUR control than public water or well water. Hey, a little lizard crap might be good for you. Cheryl...do you really know where that bottled water you are drinking came from...an what is IN it.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 3:08 am

(Video) Is it safe to drink water from a cistern?

Drinking cistern water (6)

Linda J

(@Linda_J)

Expert

We've drunk ours for 7 years without incident. Assuming your cistern is properly maintained, it is fine. But it's also a personal choice. Lots of people buy water 5 gallons at a time for actual drinking and still use the cistern water for cooking, washing dishes, etc.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 7:06 am

Drinking cistern water (7)

lc98

(@lc98)

Trusted Member

I've drunk filtered cistern water from a number of different cisterns. It tastes fine, doesn't make me sick, but always seems to give me a bit of a sore throat the next day. If I stick to bottled water, I don't have this problem.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 9:25 am

Drinking cistern water (8)

Bombi

(@Bombi)

Trusted Member

For peace of mind do some testing. You can get home bacteria tests online. Pool test strips can give you a basic idea of the level of free chlorine. Add pure, unscented bleach to bring the chlorine level to around .5mg/L, this is the level needed to kill Coliform bacteria found in the previous description of the stuff that gets into your water supply. No lizard poop isn't good for you but I expect if ingested all the time that an immunity may be developed.
Here are the basics of keeping your water safe to drink.

http://www.algomapublichealth.com/UserFiles/File/Media/Water%20Safety/551.pdf

Another thing to remember is to clean the debris out of your gutters at least 4 times a year and after a windstorm.

That said, I don't knowingly drink cistern water. RO and ultraviolet add ons are popular but generally found to ineffective due poor maintenance. I check my condo cisterns 2x's a week, more if it rains a lot. I check my home cistern once a week using free chlorine test strips.

This is another cistern water quality site http://www.ca.uky.edu/agc/pubs/ip/ip4/ip4.htm

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Posted : September 23, 2010 12:16 pm

Drinking cistern water (9)

chefnoah

(@chefnoah)

Trusted Member

I have a Pur fridge pitcher and have been drinking it like a mad man for about 5 months now. I dump some bleach in after a big rain or if it starts to smell funky. I don't think about the roof being rinsed off 🙂

Noah

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Posted : September 23, 2010 12:44 pm

Drinking cistern water (10)

aussie

(@aussie)

Trusted Member

I won't drink it - not at least not without installing a water purification system between the cistern and the faucet. That's a nasty soup stagnating in the hole under the house.

Brita filters are not water purification systems. They are particle filters.

Bottom line, you either trust in someone else to purify your drinking water as you do when you drink city water and bottled water, or you trust in yourself to purify your own water. Read up! The fact that some people drink it without apparent harm is not proof that it is safe to do so.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 12:51 pm

(Video) Example Calculation of Drinking Water Disinfection of Cistern Water with Bleach

Drinking cistern water (11)

beachy

(@beachy)

Trusted Member

and sometimes you don't know what you're drinking...we have neighbors who buy bottled water for drinking, with a prominently displayed dispenser in the kitchen....but they use cistern water for making their ice cubes...never bothers me (and I assume they treat, as long time islanders working in the medical field) but hubby can't handle it...makes him sick every time...now he just drinks beer at their house...

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Posted : September 23, 2010 1:00 pm

Drinking cistern water (12)

4crissy

(@4crissy)

Advanced Member

I knew if I asked, I wasn't going to like the reply. Yuck!! Now that I know I am not drinking that water anymore, where can I get the five gallon jug and do they deliver lol. Thanks for the info.

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Topic starter Posted : September 23, 2010 1:04 pm

Drinking cistern water (13)

stiphy

(@stiphy)

Trusted Member

We drink it, filter it for sediment with a whole house filter and through a second filter built into the fridge that advertises that it removes gihrardia and cysts. Myself, my pregnant Wife, and one year old have not had any problems with it. I do chlorinate it from time to time and looking into my cistern the water looks very clean (aka clear).

The other post on the Hovensa spill though is worrisome to some degree.

Sean

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Posted : September 23, 2010 5:23 pm

Drinking cistern water (14)

Greg _STT

(@Greg__STT)

Advanced Member

Just check in your cister fist to make sure there is nothing dead in there. Sometimes lizards get in there and die. If that happens you will usually smell it thought when you turn the water on. I drank out of my cistern all the time and never had any problems. However I would recommend bottled water instead.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 5:37 pm

Drinking cistern water (15)

rks

(@rks)

Advanced Member

Now WAIT. There is NO reason to suspect bottled 5gallon water is any better than cistern water, and is possibly much worse. Do your diligence and check that your cistern is relatively clean, your downspouts are clean and have mesh filters, and so on. Clean water falls free from the sky, you have to catch it and ensure that it stays clean.

There is no oversight for the bottlers on island and, although they are frequently tested, they frequently fail with no follow-up. Your cistern may occasionally have some organic stuff from leaves but it is unlikely that you'll have coliform bacteria, as many of the 5gallon "purified water" bottlers do.

Worse still, many of the bottled water companies are located in the area of Hovensa and get their water from wells and cisterns in that area. Hovensa has a chronic groundwater contamination problem. It is unwise to trust the bottler's filtration and reverse-osmosis system to eliminate the potentially awful stuff in the ground water from that area.

I have a notoriously touchy stomach and have never had a problem with my cistern water, although we do use a pur filter.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 5:46 pm

Drinking cistern water (16)

formersttresident

(@formersttresident)

Active Member

I lived in STT for 4 years, and would never even consider drinking cistern water.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 6:24 pm

(Video) Drinking Rain Water (How We Are Filtering Rainwater)

Drinking cistern water (17)

aussie

(@aussie)

Trusted Member

Clean water falls free from the sky...

Even a cursory look online will show that rainwater can be full of contaminants. We like to believe that the water falling from the sky is clean, but it really isn't. Everything that the water comes into contact with can also affect its quality - roof coatings, materials used in containment and distribution systems, everything right down to how clean you keep your gutters.

Cisterns can absolutely be used as a source for potable water. Becoming familiar with water purification techniques can help keep you safe. Here's but one of a number of great resources on the net:

http://www.nsf.org/consumer/rainwater_collection/index.asp?program=WaterTre

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Posted : September 23, 2010 6:43 pm

Drinking cistern water (18)

rks

(@rks)

Advanced Member

But those contaminants are as nothing compared to those to which you are exposed via the bottled water supply stream in the islands.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 7:00 pm

Drinking cistern water (19)

aussie

(@aussie)

Trusted Member

I'm headed out to buy water and you don't exactly have me feeling good about it, rks! LOL 😀

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Posted : September 23, 2010 7:16 pm

Drinking cistern water (20)

rks

(@rks)

Advanced Member

Sorry Aussie! No one should be alarmed, but nor should anyone be hysterical about cistern water. Roof coatings sold in the VI (or at least on stx) are suitable for potable water. I'll take a few parts per million of sahara dust and lizard poo over a chance at any methylene chlroide, ethylbenzene, xylenes and chloroform, for example, all of which leaked into our groundwater from the old island chemical plant.

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Posted : September 23, 2010 10:07 pm

Drinking cistern water (21)

STXBob

(@STXBob)

Trusted Member

There is all kinds of dirt on the floor of our cistern, and we still drink the water because we run it through 2 sediment filters and a UV filter, all of which we change regularly, and we get the water tested anually.

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Posted : September 24, 2010 2:31 am

(Video) How to set up whole house cistern potable water system

Drinking cistern water (22)

flatlander

(@flatlander)

Active Member

We are only considering moving there, and very excited about the possibility. The water/sewage was one of our concerns and what we will look into prior to moving there if that's what we decide to do. Here in Ohio we live in the country on a few acres and had a well drilled when we built our home 8-years ago. The water of course was tested and passed with flying colors, but we still buy the 5-gallon bottles of water to drink. We also have a water softener. We did have a purifying water system but proved to be a hassle because the pump kept going out on us. Therefore, we bought a water cooler/heater and use 5-gallon water bottles, which is probably what we would do if we move there, or anywhere else for that matter.

Are water softeners use there? Since people rely on cisterns, what about washing clothes, car, watering plants? Do cisterns ever run dry? Also what about sewage?

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Posted : September 24, 2010 5:10 pm

Drinking cistern water (23)

mminstx

(@mminstx)

Advanced Member

I wouldn't let my chihuahua drink cistern water. I guess it's your comfort level and how good your filter is. I just don't want to risk it.

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Posted : September 24, 2010 6:10 pm

Drinking cistern water (24)

mminstx

(@mminstx)

Advanced Member

Oh, flatlander, to answer your question, when I lived on the East end of St Croix, the cistern just did not stay full with the rain, and I had to buy well water and have a truck refill it. They also had an option to buy purified, but it's getting mixed with the rain! For the past 10 months, mid-island, the rain has been more than enough. This was with a water hose and laundry in both places. Was there a leak in the old place? Don't know..have never heard of anyone using softeners.

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Posted : September 24, 2010 6:19 pm

Drinking cistern water (25)

Bombi

(@Bombi)

Trusted Member

Rain water is by nature, "soft", not as many minerals in it like groundwater, vinegar is highly acidic and it breaks down the walls of the giardia cysts,

If it doesn't rain your cistern can run dry. Then you call a water truck and get a delivery.

There is some public sewage in more populated areas. Residential has subsurface disposal systems with a septic tank. Larger places may have a treatment system.

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Posted : September 24, 2010 6:35 pm

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FAQs

Is cistern water clean? ›

Water in a cistern may not necessarily be clean and potable. Hauled water may already be contaminated and even if the water has been treated, it can deteriorate during storage.

How do you purify water in a cistern? ›

To disinfect…

Place as much potable water as possible in the cistern. Add 2 gallons of 5.25 percent chlorine bleach to every 1000 gallons of water. Mix thoroughly. Use only regular chlorine bleach.

Can you drink cistern water if you boil it? ›

Consider treating the cistern water to remove or kill harmful germs or use bottled water to make sure the water is safe to drink. If someone cannot treat the cistern water, the person can reduce the chance of illness by boiling water for at least one minute before drinking it or using it for the tasks above.

How long will water last in a cistern? ›

Your water demand dictates the size of cistern you will need. A 15,000 L or 3,300 Imperial gallon cistern will store enough water to meet the demand of an average household of four for two-to-three months.

Is a cistern a good water source? ›

Pros. Cistern water systems allow more efficient and effective use of weak, low-yielding wells and springs. Cisterns let you store formerly uncollectible water, like rainwater. Cisterns store water, an advantage during droughts.

Which is better a cistern or a well? ›

Benefits of Cisterns

To build a well, for example, you must drill anywhere from 100 feet to 500 feet into the ground, which can cause damage to the environment. Cisterns often offer a more environmentally conscious way to collect water and manage it effectively.

How often should a cistern be cleaned? ›

Cisterns in these types of areas should be cleaned every three to five years, but they may be cleaned more often if there is a desire or a need to do so. Hauled water storage tank systems that use exclusively hauled water will not require cleaning nearly as often as cisterns if care is taken when re-filling occurs.

How often should you clean your water cistern? ›

It's a good idea to clean your cistern at the following times: at least 1 time a year to remove sludge and sediment buildup. when the water looks, smells, or tastes different than usual, and a test tells you it's contaminated. when contaminants—such as rodents or water from overland flooding—get in the cistern.

Are cisterns still used? ›

However, modern cisterns still serve important purposes in communities around the world. Even if wells or rivers supply plenty of drinking water for the residents, many areas require cisterns to support agriculture, manufacturing facilities, and industrial projects that demand a lot of fresh water.

Should you filter cistern water? ›

Cleaning your cistern YEARLY if you collect rain water and every 2-3 years if you just get water trucked in. Changing your water filters before they get clogged, which is 6-8 months typically if you have the large (4”x 20”) whole home filtration and more frequently if you have small 2”x10” filters.

Is toilet water OK to drink? ›

It is strongly not recommended to drink the toilet bowl water, there may be dangerous organisms (ex. E. coli and Giardia) in it.

Can I put bleach in the cistern? ›

"The biggest don't when it comes to toilet tanks is bleach—do not use bleach or products containing bleach inside the tank, as it can corrode the internal parts of your toilet. If you are aiming to remove tough stains from the tank, I also recommend white vinegar diluted with water."

Why would a house have a cistern? ›

Roof-catchment cisterns are systems used to collect and store rainwater for household and other uses. A system of gutters and downspouts directs the rainwater collected by the roof to the storage cistern.

How long can water sit and still be good? ›

Store the containers in a cool, dry, and dark place for up to 6 months (4). Tap water can be kept for up to 6 months. Though its flavor can change over time, it's still considered safe to drink if properly stored.

Why a cistern and not a well? ›

The difference between a cistern and a well is in the source of the water: a cistern collects rainwater where a well draws from groundwater.

How long should a cistern take to fill? ›

You toilet cistern should be able to refill following a flush within two minutes. If yours is taking longer, it may be a sign of a problem– so you're going to want to try and figure out what the problem is. When most people experience a problem with their toilet, they call a plumber.

How do you empty a cistern? ›

Plumbing Advice : How to Empty the Toilet Tank Completely - YouTube

Is cistern water hard or soft? ›

In general, these cistern waters are harder and contain more total solids than rain. This is due to the accumulation of dirt and dust on the surface of the cisterns. One study shows that in 500 household cisterns, hardness ranged from 35 to 150 ppm.

How deep should a cistern be? ›

How deep do the cistern tanks have to be buried? A. They have to be buried 8” to 36” below ground level. Manhole risers are available for access to tank below ground.

How deep is a cistern? ›

Cisterns are generally circular structures made of brick or wood. Ranging from 6 to 10 feet in diameter and 7 to 12 feet deep, some were built and then lowered into the ground, while others were constructed in the ground itself.

Why does my cistern water smell? ›

Bacteria growing in the drain is the most common reason for this smell. Over time, organic matter, like food waste, will accumulate on the walls of the drain and act as a nutrient for bacteria to grow. The bacteria can produce a gas (sulfur) which smells like rotten eggs or sewage.

Are cisterns expensive? ›

Cistern Cost. The price to install a cistern spans from $150 to $21,000. Prices on the low end reflect above-ground cisterns that are 50 gallons or less. The reason prices vary so much is because, unlike a rain barrel, a cistern can go above or below ground.

What are the advantages of cisterns? ›

Cisterns help manage stormwater by reducing peak runoff volumes. One benefit of this is that less water enters the storm sewer systems which means less water is delivered to a treatment facility. This lowers the cost, energy, and resources associated with cleaning this water.

What is inside a cistern? ›

A toilet cistern is the tank or reservoir that stores the water used to flush a toilet. The cistern typically houses the flush mechanism and a float valve set to fill the cistern to a predetermined level after each flush.

Is toilet water better than tap water? ›

More Bacteria Comes From Tap Water Than Flushing the Toilet, Study Shows. But the good news is that not all bacteria is bad. File this under one less thing we have to worry about: The amount of airborne bacteria that comes from a toilet flush pales in comparison to the microscopic stuff flowing in from the faucet.

Can you drink hotel sink water? ›

No matter how desperate you are for a cool drink of water in the middle of the night, do not resort to drinking from the bathroom tap. Hotel plumbing is a potential breeding ground for harmful microorganisms such E. Coli, as water in unoccupied hotel rooms can remain stagnant in pipes for days, weeks or even months.

Why does water from the bathroom taste different? ›

People particularly sensitive to the low levels of chlorine used in the water treatment process may sometimes notice a peculiar taste or smell.

Can you drink toilet water in an emergency? ›

But in an emergency, the Red Cross says you can also get water from your hot water tank, your pipes, ice cubes in your freezer, and, as a last resort, the reservoir tank of your toilet (not the bowl).

Should you clean inside toilet cistern? ›

When it comes to cleaning your toilet, the cistern often gets overlooked. That's largely because not a lot of attention goes towards limescale in a toilet cistern, as opposed keeping the pan and exterior clean. But it's always good practice to regularly descale a toilet cistern so that it works efficiently.

Can I put vinegar in my toilet tank? ›

Vinegar is a great toilet cleaning solution. Not only is it free of chemicals and naturally antibacterial, it's also an acid, so it will remove minor lime and calcium deposits. All you need to do is pour a couple cups of vinegar in your tank and let it sit for an hour or so, then scrub and flush to rinse.

What is the best in cistern cleaner? ›

The best toilet cleaner
  1. Astonish Toilet Bowl Cleaner Tablets. ...
  2. Harpic Power Plus Toilet Cleaner Gel. ...
  3. Domestos Zero Limescale Ocean Toilet Cleaner. ...
  4. Ecozone Forever Flush 2000 Toilet Cleaner. ...
  5. Bloo Foam Aroma Ocean Mist Fragranced Powder. ...
  6. Ecover Toilet Cleaner Pine Fresh. ...
  7. Bloo Fragrance Switch.
22 Jul 2021

Can you store water for 5 years? ›

Commercially packaged water can be stored for about 5 years; home filled stored water should be changed annually. Stored water will go flat but can be aerated prior to consumption by pouring it between two containers a few times.

Can distilled water grow bacteria? ›

Many microorganisms ("oligotrophs") grow in distilled water: Pseudomonas spp., Caulobacter spp., Hyphomicrobium spp., Arthrobacter spp., Seliberia spp., Bactoderma alba, Corynebacterium spp., Amycolata (Nocardia) autotrophica, Mycobacterium spp., yeasts, and Chlorella spp.

Is it OK to drink bottled water left overnight? ›

We've all gotten a mouthful of weird-tasting morning-after water, but why does the flavor change? And is it safe to drink? The short answer is that it's perfectly fine to drink.

› ... › Interior Remodeling ›

Cisterns are stone wells that are often found in older houses or landscaping. A cistern is designed to act as a water reservoir, holding the water until it'...

Old Cisterns - OHW

http://www.oldhouseweb.com › forums › viewtopic
http://www.oldhouseweb.com › forums › viewtopic
I am wanting to clean out the old cistern in my back yard and use it for watering flowers, the garden, etc. We have already pumped out most of the water in it, ...
When to clean and disinfect. A cistern should be cleaned & disinfected after installation, repairs or receipt of hauled water to guarantee a safe drinking w...

Is it true that toilet water is the cleanest? ›

Toilet Water Same as Drinking Water

Generally speaking, most water supply pipes to the toilet are the same water to the kitchen sink. So the water running to the toilet tank is as clean as your kitchen drinking water.

How dirty is flushed toilet water? ›

Is The Water In The Toilet Dirty? The water in your toilet bowl is actually clean. Sure, it is full of bacteria, but that is because it contains sewage—which, by definition, is wastewater that contains human waste. However, the water itself is relatively clean and poses no health risk.

Is toilet flush water drinkable? ›

In some parts of the world, the wastewater that flows down the drain – yes, including toilet flushes – is now being filtered and treated until it's as pure as spring water, if not more so. It might not sound appealing, but recycled water is safe and tastes like any other drinking water, bottled or tap.

Should you clean inside toilet cistern? ›

When it comes to cleaning your toilet, the cistern often gets overlooked. That's largely because not a lot of attention goes towards limescale in a toilet cistern, as opposed keeping the pan and exterior clean. But it's always good practice to regularly descale a toilet cistern so that it works efficiently.

Which countries use water instead of toilet paper? ›

France, Portugal, Italy, Japan, Argentina, Venezuela, and Spain: Instead of toilet paper, people from these countries (most of them from Europe) usually have a bidet in their washrooms. A bidet like a toilet, but also includes a spout that streams water like a water fountain to rinse you clean.

Is it more hygienic to use toilet paper or water? ›

Water is more hygienic if I'm to consider, since all the urine and poop gets washed off, leaving a clean bottom. There is no poop-y smell left in the underwear. No matter how much you scrub with a toilet paper, a residual smell is always left behind. With water, there is less friction against the skin.

What is the cleanest bathroom in the world? ›

The Cleanest Toilets in the World
TOP 10 PUBLIC TOILETS THROUGHOUT THE WORLD
RankCountryCity
1SingaporeSingapore
2GermanyHamburg
3JapanTokyo
7 more rows
21 Jul 2021

Is your mouth dirtier than a toilet? ›

Fact 4: Toilet seats have less germs than mouths! It is estimated that toilet seats have 3,200 bacteria per square inch, where as saliva has an estimated 100 million microbes of bacteria per mililitre with anywhere between 400 and 600 different species.

Are phones dirtier than toilets? ›

Researchers at the University of Arizona found that cellphones carry ten times more bacteria than a toilet seat. While many bacteria are harmless, some studies have found serious pathogens on cellphones like E-Coli, MRSA, and Strep. To avoid picking up bacteria, don't take your phone in the bathroom with you.

Why is toilet water the cleanest? ›

"The toilet water is usually cleaner with regard to bacteria because toilets get continuously flushed, whereas a water fountain is left open to the environment," said Dr. Phillip Tierno of New York University Medical Center.

Can you drink hotel sink water? ›

No matter how desperate you are for a cool drink of water in the middle of the night, do not resort to drinking from the bathroom tap. Hotel plumbing is a potential breeding ground for harmful microorganisms such E. Coli, as water in unoccupied hotel rooms can remain stagnant in pipes for days, weeks or even months.

Can I drink my bathroom water? ›

So to sum up the answer to the question “is it safe to drink bathroom tap water?” - no, not really. Even though homes and hotels are supplied with water safe for drinking, there are too many variables to consider to completely guarantee its safety. So it's best to avoid drinking from a bathroom tap if you can.

Which water is safe for drinking? ›

Purified water is usually tap or groundwater which has been treated to remove harmful substances like bacteria, fungi, and parasites. This means that drinking it is pretty much guaranteed to be safe.

How often should a cistern be cleaned? ›

Cisterns in these types of areas should be cleaned every three to five years, but they may be cleaned more often if there is a desire or a need to do so. Hauled water storage tank systems that use exclusively hauled water will not require cleaning nearly as often as cisterns if care is taken when re-filling occurs.

Should you put bleach in your cistern? ›

Plain bleach is an excellent choice and will also deal with any nasty smells coming from your cistern. not only does it clean, but it kills bacteria too.

Can I put bleach in my toilet cistern? ›

"The biggest don't when it comes to toilet tanks is bleach—do not use bleach or products containing bleach inside the tank, as it can corrode the internal parts of your toilet. If you are aiming to remove tough stains from the tank, I also recommend white vinegar diluted with water."

Videos

1. How I maintain my cistern water
(Mosaicmaster 1)
2. Drink Water From Your Own Cistern
(The Real Deal)
3. What's In Your Cistern Water?
(Water Superstore)
4. Make your own water filter and never buy drinking water again.
(Jon Jandai Life is Easy)
5. Disinfecting Drinking Water with Bleach
(WELSBY ROOTS)
6. Underground Water Tank Real Costs Behind Them
(Nick Nicoloudis)

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